Light and Shadow

Catcher: Light and Shadow

(originally published November 2007)

Trevor Bennett has been seen throughout the local art scene for almost as long as my memory allows from the time I first got involved and started paying attention. What’s always been impressive about this guy is his passion and dedication. Theatre, musicals, an intensive program, and teaching. Bennett doesn’t lack discipline in the least and it’s been rewarded with the release of his band’s first album in September 2007. I caught up with him to chat about Catcher and the many meanings of Light and Shadow.

Who’s Catcher and how long have you been around?

I’ve been writing toward the project for over three years now – the live band has been playing together for about a year.

What can people expect from Catcher?

Lots of energy and interplay from the live show, the album is geared a little more toward layers and production. There are different sides to the project, it keeps things interesting.

Why do you do what you do?

It’s the one thing that feels completely natural to me. I feel like I’ve maybe got something to say, and this is the most direct way of expressing it.

How difficult is it to balance these interests and real life commitments?

It can be tricksy. I’m working toward the end of my voice degree at MUN School of Music and the two can clash from time to time. It’s not at all an easy thing to try and get by on songs alone. But you make it work ’cause you love it, hey?

What can people expect from “Light and Shadow”?

Well, there’s a lot on the record in terms of moods, styles, instrumentations. For the most part it’s a rock record, but the production gets a bit involved here and there. I’m a big fan of industrial rock and large scale music so I like to find room for vocal harmonies, pianos, strings and synthesizers and programming and lions and tigers and bears, oh my!

Why did you want to do this project so badly and where did the title come from?

I borrowed the title from a set of lyrics that were supposed to belong to another project – I like the breadth of those two words. Liken it to the bel canto/art term chiaroscuro (light/shade), it’s a balance thing. Light and dark are such universally identifiable opposites and finding your place between them is… well, its life really, isn’t it?

What was it like for you to finally release your first full length album?

It’s an incredible feeling of accomplishment – I’m doing something with my life. (Mum, I swear!) Its validation, in a tangible form, of the work I’ve put in over the years – I have a discography, for ever and ever, amen.

What kind of steps had to happen to make it come to life?

Many steps. I had James March – the drummer record the drum tracks first then brought the sessions to my home studio and played everything else myself over the course of a few months – guitars, bass, piano, keyboards, programming, sequencing, trumpet, auxiliary percussion, and more vocal tracks than you can shake a stick at. Justin Merdsoy, a talented friend of mine, did the mix. Then it shipped off to Toronto to be mastered at the Lacquer Channel by a sweetheart named Noah Mintz. Luke Merdsoy did a gorgeous job on the graphic design – allow two business weeks for pressing, and voila!

The album is even available on iTunes, how did that come into being?

tunecore.com.  The market’s opening up, whether big labels like it or not. The tools are out there to allow artists to create and produce their music, and the DIY marketing avenues are finally coming online. I’ve sold songs in Japan? Brave new world.

What’s next for Catcher?

Shows, shows, and shows, I hope. I’d love to get the boys out to tour, and I can’t wait to get this term over with so I can start writing again – I’d like not to have to wait three years to get the next album finished.

Want more? Check out www.catcher.ca.

– Joshua Jamieson (dj m0xY)

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